Tuesday, 19 September 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books On My Fall TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish, here, inviting bloggers and readers to list their top ten for a certain category.



This week we were asked to list our Top Ten Books on our Fall TBR, and though mine are very similar to my September TBR, I've added a few recent purchases too.

ARCs to catch up on:

The Waking Land - Callie Bates
Shadowcaster - Cinda Williams Chima
Flame in the Mist - Renee Adieh
The Last Thing You Said - Sara Biren

Current/Future ARCs:

Daughter of the Burning City - Amanda Foody
The Fandom - Anna Day
Mask of Shadows - Lindsey Miller

Fun Picks:

Songs About Us - Chris Russell
Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue - Mackenzie Lee
Invictus - Ryan Graudin

What does your Fall TBR look like? As always feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter!

Thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf




Sunday, 17 September 2017

Blog Tour: ARC Review of Fire Lines by Cara Thurlbourne

Hello everyone! Today I'm overjoyed to bring you my review of a wonderful YA fantasy for the official Blog Tour! I do hope you enjoy it. Big thanks to Faye Rogers for organising and sending me an e-arc, though my review is in no way influenced.

When your blood line awakens, how do you choose between family and freedom? Émi’s father used to weave beautiful tales of life beyond the wall, but she never knew if they were true. Now, her father is gone and Émi has been banished to the Red Quarter, where she toils to support herself and her mother – obeying the rules, hiding secrets and suffering the cruelties of the council’s ruthless Cadets. But when Émi turns seventeen, sparks fly – literally. Her blood line surges into life and she realises she has a talent for magick… a talent that could get her killed. 


Fire Lines is a wonderful mix of all of my favourite fantasy elements; magic, different races, myth, discovery, lies and more. It's a twisting tale that will have you second guessing characters and actions with every turn of the page, and leave you breathless with anticipation for the second book.

Fire Lines follows Émi, who lives in the fear governed, walled city of Nhatu. Her life is all too cyclical, repetitive day in and day out, and seemingly never ending. She looks after her mother and her sole joy comes from her childhood friend Tsam, who seldom visits due to class divisions. Émi's hiding a dark secret though, a magical prowess she barely understands, and when it is revealed her world is turned upside down. Secrets more than own come to light and the world she thoughts she knew comes to life around her. If you're looking for a book that's relentless in both action and plot twists, then Fire Lines is the book for you; I raced through it in two days, desperate to know the jaw dropping conclusion at its finale. Featuring a dark villain and morally ambiguous characters, Fire Lines was a joy to read and has quickly become one of my favourite releases of this year. The story is just so rich not only in plot but characters, races and locations, that it was a beauty for my mind's eye to behold.

The characters were quite easily my favourite part. I've said it before but I love stories with a great range of characters, each real, flawed and all the same wonderful. Fire Lines did not hold back. Émi is our main character, feisty, passionate and one heck of a warrior. She fights for what she believes in, what she knows is right, and won't let anyone tell her otherwise. Kole was definitely my favourite character and I dare any of you not to fall for him. A Taman, a warrior with an elephant partner (Maya, you'll love her, and her son *Grin*), he fiercely protects Émi and their friends. Often withdrawn only she seems able to pull his true self out and show us how amazing he really is. Plus his relationship with Maya is so adorable. Garrett was my other favourite, my adorable little cinnamon roll. You'll also meet Tsam, fierce yet kind, and Garrett's very protective sister, Alyssa. There's a few more, but I won't spoil anything. Be warned though, there is heartbreak between these hallowed pages, another reason why I fiercely adored this book.

Last but by no means least, I have to mention the world that Thurlbourne has created. Bright, vivid, alive. This is a world you will want to live in, or at the very least explore yourself. I do. From dark Nhatu to beautiful Abilene, this is a world you can imagine being real and just don't want to leave. It's phenomenal. A beautiful map just adds to the vivid picture painted and makes the adventure contained in the pages all the more wonderful.

Overall, Fire Lines is an exciting, intriguing book that's well executed and draws you in quite easily, then refuses to let go. I absolutely adored it and can't wait for the sequel. Fire Lines deserves a most definitive 5 stars!


What are your thoughts on Fire Lines? As always feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter!

Thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Information about the Book

Title: Fire Lines
Author: Cara Thurlbourn
Release Date: 26th September 2017
Genre: YA Fantasy
Publisher: Bewick Press
Format: Paperback


Author Information

Cara Thurlbourn writes children’s and young adult fiction. 'Fire Lines' is her first novel and it’s a story she’s been planning since she was fifteen years old.

Cara has a degree in English from the University of Nottingham and an MA in Publishing from Oxford Brookes University.

She lives in a tiny village in Suffolk and has worked in academic and educational publishing for nearly ten years. Cara blogs about her author journey and in November 2016 she crowdfunded her first children’s book. 10% of its profits are donated to animal rehoming charities.

Cara plans to write at least two more books in the Fire Lines series, as well as a young adult mystery series, and has lots more children’s stories waiting in the wings.

You can sign up for Cara’s newsletter, for giveaways, updates and latest releases, here: www.firelines.co.uk


Check Out the Rest of the Blog Tour!



Tuesday, 12 September 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Books I Loved During The First Year I Started My Blog

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish, here, inviting bloggers and readers to list their top ten for a certain category.


This week we've been given a throwback challenge and I've decided as per the prompt to tackle 10 books I loved in my first blogging year. I hope you like my picks.

1) Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge - The first book I reviewed.
2) Night Owls by Jenn Bennett - The first ARC I received.
3) Counting Stars by Keris Stainton.
4) House of Windows by Alexia Casale.
5) The Sin Eater's Daughter by Melinda Salisbury - It's Mel after all ;)
6) Dumplin by Julie Murphy.
7) Never Evers by Lucy Ivision and Tom Ellen.
8) Defender of the Realm by Mark Huckerby and Nick Ostler.
9) Across the Universe by Beth Revis.
10) The Sleeping Prince by Melinda Salisbury - Again, it's Mel.

What are your picks for this week's TTT? As always feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter!

Thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Monday, 11 September 2017

Cover Spotlight Monday: Daughter of the Burning City by Amanda Foody

Hi guys! I'm back with more regarding Daughter of the Burning City today because wow I just love this book (so far, ha, I'm still reading) and the cover is too pretty not to spotlight.

Sixteen-year-old Sorina has spent most of her life within the smoldering borders of the Gomorrah Festival. Yet even among the many unusual members of the traveling circus-city, Sorina stands apart as the only illusion-worker born in hundreds of years. This rare talent allows her to create illusions that others can see, feel and touch, with personalities all their own. Her creations are her family, and together they make up the cast of the Festival’s Freak Show.

But no matter how lifelike they may seem, her illusions are still just that—illusions, and not truly real. Or so she always believed…until one of them is murdered.

Desperate to protect her family, Sorina must track down the culprit and determine how they killed a person who doesn’t actually exist. Her search for answers leads her to the self-proclaimed gossip-worker Luca, and their investigation sends them through a haze of political turmoil and forbidden romance, and into the most sinister corners of the Festival. But as the killer continues murdering Sorina’s illusions one by one, she must unravel the horrifying truth before all of her loved ones disappear.

Seriously though, what a cover. I love so many things about it. First of all, maybe a little superficially, but I just love the two toned purple background. Purple is my favourite colour and so I'm always very quickly drawn to purple books. Second, the gold hat and filigree. This really does just evoke such a magical feeling, and instantly draws me into what the book is about. Magic, the circus, supernatural. It draws me in. It makes me want to know more about the world I'm about to step foot into.

The lettering is just exquisite and I'm not sure what it reminds me more of. On one hand I feel like it's supposed to be chalk letters, evoking a feeling of the travelling circus, headlines and dates changing rapidly with every town they visit. But it also reminds me eerily of bone and draws me into the murder mystery side of the book, wondering who might become a victim, what the consequences might be, and who the villain ultimately is.

Most importantly I love the tagline. Who is wicked? Or what? Which city will burn? And why? So many questions and all the answers just waiting to be revealed once the beautiful cover is pulled back. Moreover, what exactly is this beautiful cover hiding? A dark and sinister tale perhaps. Only time, and reading, will tell...

What do you think of the cover of Daughter of the Burning City? As always do feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter!

Thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Sunday, 10 September 2017

Spotlight Sunday: Diversity Recs - Daughter of the Burning City by Amanda Foody

Hello lovely readers! For Diversity Recs this Sunday I have a new release to spotlight! Daughter of the Burning City by Amanda Foody was released 7 Sept in the UK (25 July in the US), and I was lucky enough to get both an e-ARC and also an early finished copy from YALC. My review will be up soon.

Sixteen-year-old Sorina has spent most of her life within the smoldering borders of the Gomorrah Festival. Yet even among the many unusual members of the traveling circus-city, Sorina stands apart as the only illusion-worker born in hundreds of years. This rare talent allows her to create illusions that others can see, feel and touch, with personalities all their own. Her creations are her family, and together they make up the cast of the Festival’s Freak Show. But no matter how lifelike they may seem, her illusions are still just that—illusions, and not truly real. Or so she always believed…until one of them is murdered. Desperate to protect her family, Sorina must track down the culprit and determine how they killed a person who doesn’t actually exist. Her search for answers leads her to the self-proclaimed gossip-worker Luca, and their investigation sends them through a haze of political turmoil and forbidden romance, and into the most sinister corners of the Festival. But as the killer continues murdering Sorina’s illusions one by one, she must unravel the horrifying truth before all of her loved ones disappear.

This book is reported to feature a Bi-romantic, Asexual main character and I think that's just wonderful. Bi/Ace rep is very hard to find in YA, even in this modern era, and so its highly refreshing to see. As someone who identifies as Bi-romantic on the Asexual spectrum, I'm overjoyed by this rep. Absolutely ecstatic! I've started reading the book this weekend and I love it so far. The story is magical, intriguing in itself, but it's the rep I can't wait to see in its entirety.

We've all said it in so many tweets, but diversity is so important, especially in YA. So many teens deal with figuring out their identity and books can help a great deal, but only if they're diverse, only if these teens can see themselves in the characters. Had I read these books when I was younger I might have figured out my own identity earlier than 24. Books have power and authors have a responsibility to wield that power for the better. Books aren't just about entertainment. They're about life. That's why I'm overjoyed when such representation is presented in a YA novel. My heart swells.

So I'm off now to go and continue this wonderfully sounding tale. As always feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter! Thanks for reading, and check back Sunday 24th for a spotlight on a future release, Mask of Shadows by Linsey Miller.

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Saturday, 9 September 2017

Saturday Series: Love, Hate or Both? - Character Death

Okay, so I read a book recently where one of my favourite characters fell victim to the story's villain and, along with my current obsession with Les Miserables, it got me thinking about my feelings toward character death. Spoilers for Chicago Fire, Supernatural, Les Mis, Torchwood and Criminal Minds below.

Personally I have mixed feelings, so it's definitely a love/hate relationship with the subject. The threat of death often heightens the experience of reading/watching a story. Tension increases. We speculate, talk, investigate. This is usually why TV shows love to end seasons on 'Will everyone make it?' cliffhangers. It generates publicity and promotion, and likely increases ratings for the new season. It's a common tactic. But the outcome itself can have mixed reactions, including backlash, and can also have the opposite effect in losing viewers or readers.

Firstly, the who. Losing a popular character can effect a franchise's (All media types) audience both personally (identification and representation wise) and in terms of enjoying the remaining characters and their dynamic. Two instances for me personally are Chicago Fire (CF) and Criminal Minds (CM) respectively. When CF lost Leslie Shay it was not only sad in the extent of the character no longer being there and the changes it brought to the team dynamic, but it was also a huge loss in that Shay was openly a lesbian and never once changed who she was or showed any hesitation toward being anyone but herself. To lose such a powerful unique character who could have spoken to (and probably did) so many people - the only non heterosexual character in the show - most likely affected many viewers on a personal level too, and could have prevented them from wanting to watch future episodes. CM meanwhile felt a serious change in dynamic upon Emily Prentis' death, resulting in fan backlash and the character's eventual revival; a revival which then ultimately cheapened the show's tension and ability to place its characters in mortal peril. For a procedural this, to me, heralded disaster in the form of boredom. No tension equals no energy.

Secondly, the how and the why. I ran a poll on my Twitter account yesterday asking people for their opinions on the subject. While some chose the 'Totally fine' or 'Noooooo' options as to their feelings, and only a few comments were received, the response largely agreed with my own love/hate situation. 'Depends on the reason' was chosen by more than two thirds, and the comments received agreed that it's the how and why that matters more;



A death for drama's sake can anger audiences, resulting in rather verbal responses and 'resurrection campaigns' which too can harm a franchises overall rating and response. Such was the reaction to Ianto Jones' demise in season three of Torchwood. Though heartbreakingly wonderful in its own right (filming style, music choice, etc) the death itself was cheapened by its lack of necessity. Yes it was a global threat facing the team, the danger immense, but having started as a team of six, losing one in the first episode and two in the previous season, it was apparent that the writers were a little too trigger happy and left the original fans with little to hold onto going into season four. Again, on the personal side of representation, Ianto too (along with Tosh who passed in season 2) was an LGBTQ+ character, and the death could have affected viewers on a personal as well as fan level. In all cases, the reason has to be adequate and necessary, the execution flawless. Ripples must be felt. The characters cannot simply be forgotten. To the fans who love them, a character's death is never simply a plot device and that alone.

The last issue, in my opinion, is frequency. Too many deaths can have the opposite effect to increasing tension, and instead increase predictability and therefore boredom. One of the most obvious examples is in the case of Supernatural. This was a show I used to adore but now have no desire to watch as I felt every finale too predictable. One brother dies, gets resurrected somehow, then the other, and so on. With every threat introduced there was no danger, no tension, because we the audience knew the two beloved brothers are safe. Obviously they always would be (there'd be no show otherwise), but there's no need to make it so obvious.

One last thing of interest is also the media type, as I believe this has impact on audience reaction, because of two reasons.

1) Potential character longevity.
2) Ability to re-use characters.

Going back to Les Mis, this show has a lot of deaths; real emotional sucker punches, and I love them all. Part of this is execution - yes. They're well done, emotional and have an iron-clad reason for being there. But also the character longevity is short anyway. There'd rarely be a spinoff or sequel to a show/musical, so the impact on viewership is diminished. The story is a whole. There's little to 'fall out with' as a result. It's the same with standalone movies too, and single books.

Book and TV series' are a different matter, because there's an expectation for the characters to continue. Which brings in my second point. If a book character dies midway through a trilogy, while the chance they'll reappear in that trilogy is slim, there's always a chance for a spin-off or prequel, if applicable. With TV shows this is less likely and even if a spinoff does happen, if a character died seasons ago that actor could have moved on, making it harder to re-use the character. TV character deaths are therefore, in a way, always harder to handle. Most likely, that's it. Sad, but true.


Anyway, that's all my thoughts expelled for today. I hope you enjoyed the post, and as always do feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Tuesday, 5 September 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Struggled With...

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish, here, inviting bloggers and readers to list their top ten for a certain category


Today I only have five instead of ten, which can be seen as unfortunate or not considering the category. Some of these I finished, some I didn't. I hope you enjoy.

1) The Dark Days Club by Alison Goodman

I really wanted to like this book but it just ended up feeling really slow and unfortunately I had to DNR it. I'm hoping to try again someday soon.

2) Burning Glass by Kathryn Purdie

Again this one felt a little slow, but moreover it was the character development that didn't quite sit well with me.

3) Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

I loved the idea of this book, and the ending was fabulous, but I'd been expecting a lot more, as in actual competition between the sisters. This book felt more like set-up for book 2, but nonetheless I'm excited for the sequel.

4) Timebomb by Scott Andrews

Again I struggled with this one due to pace and the flicking around between the time periods, but I ended up absolutely loving it. Though I still need to finish book two, I'll admit...

5) Crown of Midnight by Sarah Maas

This one was mainly due to having read certain spoilers, and I still haven't finished it. I doubt I ever will tbh.


I hope you enjoyed my TTT this week! As always feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter!

Thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Monday, 4 September 2017

Cover Spotlight Monday: The Extinction Trials by Susan Wilson

"DINOSAURS! ON A SPACESHIP!"

Oh, wait... wrong thing. Sorry...

I managed to get an ARC of this book whilst at YALC and it sounds incredible. The cover was revealed only days ago and so I thought today would be the perfect time to have a look at it.



Betrayal. Sacrifice. Survival.
Welcome to the Extinction Trials.

In Stormchaser and Lincoln's ruined world, the only way to survive is to risk everything. To face a contest more dangerous than anyone can imagine. And they will do anything to win.

But in a land full of monsters - human and reptilian - they can't afford to trust anyone. Perhaps not even each other...




The Extinction Trials honestly sounds like my perfect book, and just look at that gorgeous cover! I absolutely adore it!

First and foremost I love the exotic leaf design that takes up most of the cover and how the hue has been made to be blue with the black background. It alludes to the dinosaurs that are sure (I'm pretty sure anyway...) to roam the book, but also the danger of being around such creatures; the secrets that darkness may hold between the trees.

The half face edging into the foreground, illuminated only partially, is really creepy and lends a dark, sinister feel to the cover. I also feel it alludes to a sense that the dinosaurs aren't the real enemy here, and that our characters are more likely to be a danger to each other. Yet the pink/purple iris has more of a supernatural feel, though I'm not sure what that could link to.

Lastly the tagline really gives me shivers, and definitely alludes - as above - to the potential rivalry and danger that the characters may face at the hands of each other, and how far they might need to go to survive.

Overall the cover just makes me want to read the book even more. I can't wait to tuck in!

What are your thoughts on the cover of The Extinction Trials? As always feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter.

Thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


September TBR!

For the first time in a while I've decided to post a TBR. Too often I let reading slumps get to me, or forget about my challenges, and so while I don't always like deciding what to read in advance, I think it might help me for now. This month I've decided on the following;

ARCs to catch up on:

The Waking Land - Callie Bates
Shadowcaster - Cinda Williams Chima
Flame in the Mist - Renee Adieh
The Last Thing You Said - Sara Biren

Current/Future ARCs:

Fire Lines - Cara Thurlborne
Daughter of the Burning City - Amanda Foody
The Fandom - Anna Day
Mask of Shadows - Lindsey Miller

Fun Picks:

There's Someone Inside Your House - Stephanie Perkins
Songs About Us - Chris Russell
Rebel of the Sands - Alwyn Hamilton

What do you think of my picks? I'm hoping to read a few more but I'll stick with those for now. Do you have a September TBR? As always do feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter!

Thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Tuesday, 29 August 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: 10 Hidden Gem Books In The Fantasy Genre

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish, here, inviting bloggers and readers to list their top ten for a certain category



Today my Top Ten Tuesday is the 10 Hidden Gems, in my opinion, of the fantasy genre. I hope you enjoy!

1) Magus of Stonewylde by Kit Berry
2) A Shadow Bright and Burning by Jessica Cluess
3) The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
4) The Sin Eater's Daughter by Melinda Salisbury
5)Lois Lane: Fallout by Gwenda Bond (I'm classing it as fantasy because of the superhero aspects)
6)Flamecaster by Cinda Williams Chima
7)Eon by Alison Goodman
8) Snow Like Ashes by Sara Raasch
9) A Darker Shade of Magic by Victoria Schwab
10) Stealing Snow by Danielle Paige

I hope you enjoyed my Top Ten Tuesday this week! As always feel free to leave a comment below or @me on Twitter!

Thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Monday, 28 August 2017

Cover Spotlight Monday: The Infernal Devices by Cassandra Clare

Hi everyone! Today I've decided to spotlight one of my all time favourite series' because they just have the most gorgeous covers. It's of course The Infernal Devices series by Cassandra Clare.


I adore these covers for many reasons but the main one is the fact that the three main characters are featured on the covers. Book one features Will, book two my beloved Jem, and book three Tessa. I love this specifically because it helps me to imagine the characters as I read, and also provides life to the covers rather than them just featuring scenery or objects.

Moreover I love how the titles seem to reflect each character pictured Angel; Will, for how he saved Tessa. Prince; Jem, for how he showed Tessa true love and kindness. Princess: Tessa, for the happiness she gave to Jem. It just makes them even more beautiful in my opinion.

Finally I love the backgrounds behind the characters, which really reflect the Victorian London period that the books are set in, and give the readers a real feel for the books, allowing them to picture every scene.

Really, I think these covers are simply stunning.

What do you think? As always do feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter, and thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Sunday, 27 August 2017

Spotlight Sunday: Diversity Recs - Wing Jones by Katherine Webber

Hello everyone! Today I have another Diversity Recs for you and this time it's one of my favourite reads of 2017! I'm of course talking about the wonderful Wing Jones by Katherine Webber.






For fans of David Levithan, Jandy Nelson and Rainbow Rowell: a sweeping story about love and family from an exceptional new voice in YA. With a grandmother from China and another from Ghana, fifteen-year-old Wing Jones is often caught between worlds. But when tragedy strikes, Wing discovers a talent for running she never knew she had. Wing's speed could bring her family everything it needs. It could also stop Wing getting the one thing she wants.







Wing Jones is a wonderful, inspiring tale about tragedy, love and ambition. It's a tale that makes you want to get up and go; to pursue those dreams you've always thought about but never actioned. It's also just a lovely, fun read to sit and enjoy on a relaxing Saturday afternoon. But more importantly it's amazingly diverse.

Wing is bi-racial, with one grandmother from China and one from Ghana. Her heritage colours the story so wonderfully, educational for those like myself who wouldn't know otherwise. Her grandmothers are each such unique, often hilarious, people who bring such a vibrancy to the story, even in some of its darker chapters.

What's so much more important though is simply the representation itself.

In YA there is such a vast range of genres, sub-genres, plots and cliches, but one thing that always seems a struggle to find - for myself and others I have spoken to - is diversity in everything from sexuality to race and culture. It does seem we're starting to see more of an influx in diverse YA but there's still a way to go; part of the reason why I wanted to create this series in order to highlight these often amazing stories that could go missed by those who need them. Wing Jones hosts a whole diverse cast, and it was so wonderful to read about them, but that cast could be so so important for any reader who may have before struggled to see themselves in what they were reading.

So I really do urge you all to read this wonderful story, even more so if it speaks to you personally. I'm pretty sure you won't regret it.

Do you have any thoughts about Wing Jones, or feel like sharing your own diverse rec? Feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter!

As always, thanks for reading!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf


Saturday, 26 August 2017

Saturday Series: Love, Hate or Both? - Harry Potter

Hi guys! Just a quick post today for the next in my Love, Hate or Both series. I would have loved to make it longer but life once again prevented me from writing this prior to today, and I've been super busy. Here's hoping the long weekend will let me get ahead of the game for once!

It's no secret that I love Harry Potter. Hell I'm pretty sure everyone does. But the question is why? Why do I feel so attached to the story, the characters, the setting? It's not just a case of it being a beloved childhood book, that's for sure, and are there any parts I dislike?

I think, plain and simple, it boils down to family. JK wrote a story that, at its core, is about family. The family we have but also the family we make and I think that's a pretty universal concept. But moreover she's created a family within her fans. We can quite easily strike up conversation with someone else when it comes to Harry Potter.

What's your house?
Who's your favourite character?
Which book did you like best?

It's a phenomenon that has brought people together, that brings joy and wonder to all ages, and I think that's a wonderful thing indeed.

As for what I don't like, well... I wasn't too keen on certain characters' endings, but mostly I just get annoyed at not being able to find any Ravenclaw merchandise. Haha!

What do you love about HP? What's your house? Do feel free to leave a comment below or @ me on Twitter.

Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoyed the post!

Holly @The_Arts_Shelf